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The Past, Present, and Future International Order in East Asia

Stanford, CA, U.S.A

JIIA and Stanford University co-hosted a symposium titled " The Past, Present, and Future International Order in East Asia " on May 10, 2019.


JIIA-Stanford Symposium: The Past, Present, and Future International Order in East Asia
Bechtel Conference Center, Encina Hall, Stanford University
Friday 10 May 2019

StanfordSymposium_.jpg

Interstate relations in East Asia are at a critical juncture. The post-World War II regional order, shaped by the San Francisco Treaty of 1951, is under stress. It is unclear if this system will be maintained, and if not, what will replace it. The lineage of the San Francisco System itself reaches back to the post-World War I Versailles-Washington System. An examination of the success and shortcomings of each of these systems can offer insights on the rise and fall of international systems in an Asian context.

In this symposium co-hosted by the Japan Institute for International Affairs (JIIA) and Walter H. Shorenstein Asia Pacific Research Center (APARC) of the Freeman Spogli Institute of International Studies (FSI) at Stanford University, we explored the circumstances that shaped the establishment and evolution of the East Asian political, economic, and security architectures from post-WWI to present; discussed the forces that built and undermined the past and existing architecture; and debated possible regional futures.

Panel 1: Comparing "the Versailles-Washington System" and "San Francisco System": Lessons from the Rise and Fall of International Orders in East Asia
During this session, panelists identified the factors that led to the establishment of "the Versailles-Washington System" and "San Francisco System", their characteristics, their sources of stability and instability, and relevant lessons for policymakers today.

Panel 2: Japanese, U.S. and Chinese Interests and Security Strategies
During this session, panelists discussed the national security objectives of Japan, US, and PRC, and these three states' respective strategies for achieving these objectives. Panelists also addressed how bilateral and trilateral relations among these three states impact peace and stability in East Asia.

Panel 3: Alternative Future East Asia Systems
During this session, panelists discussed possible alternative future "East Asia Systems" focusing on how interrelationships between Japan, US, and PRC might influence the establishment and stability of different models. Participants also refered to the lessons of "the Versailles-Washington System" and "San Francisco System" if relevant.

<Program>

JIIA-Stanford Symposium:
"The Past, Present, and Future International Order in East Asia"
Shorenstein Asia Pacific Research Center (APARC), Stanford University
&
Japan Institute of International Affairs (JIIA)
Friday, May 10, 2019

9:15 am-9:30 am - Welcome Remarks

Gi-Wook Shin, Director, APARC, Stanford University
Kenichiro Sasae, President, JIIA
Takeo Hoshi, Director, Japan Program, APARC, Stanford University


9:45 am-11:30 am - Panel 1: Comparing "the Versailles-Washington System" and "San Francisco System": Lessons from the Rise and Fall of International Orders in East Asia

Chair:

Daniel Sneider, FSI, Stanford University

Panelists:

Shin Kawashima, University of Tokyo
Masaya Inoue, Seikei University
Lin Hsiao-ting, Hoover Institution, Stanford University
David Kennedy, FSI, Stanford University

Rapporteur:

Thomas Wilkins, Senior Visiting Fellow, JIIA

1:15 pm-3:00 pm - Panel 2: Japanese, U.S. and Chinese Interests and Security Strategies

Chair:

Kenichiro Sasae, President, JIIA

Panelists:

Ken Jimbo, Keio University
Tetsuo Kotani, JIIA
Mike Lampton, APARC, Stanford University
Jim Schoff, CEIP

Rapporteur:

Jonathan Berkshire Miller, Senior Visiting Fellow, JIIA

3:30pm-5:15pm - Panel 3: Alternative Future East Asia Systems

Chair:

Phillip Lipscy, APARC, Stanford University

Panelists:

Jim Fearon, FSI, Stanford University
Ryo Sahashi, University of Tokyo
Kenichiro Sasae, President, JIIA
Tom Christensen, Columbia University

Rapporteur:

Thomas Wilkins, Senior Visiting Fellow, JIIA

5:15 pm-5:35 pm - Rapporteurs' review of symposium discussions

5:35 pm-5:45 pm - Closing Remarks

Karl Eikenberry, US-Asia Security Initiative, APARC, Stanford University
Kenichiro Sasae, JIIA


・Summary(English Version)

・Summary(Japanese Version)

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